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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,966 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss. >> and so your position is it was waived? >> yes. >> but it was not adjudicated. is there -- >> it was not adjudicated in this case. our position, it was waived when it was not raised in a rule 12 motion. >> what effects that commenced in the united states or that are closely related to the united states exist between what happened here and what happened in nigeria? >> the only connection between the events in nigeria and the united states is that the plaintiffs are now living in the united states and have asylum because of those events, and the defendants are here. there's no other connection between the events that took place in
had. france looks a lot more like the united states, frankly. the western hat name in the last decade is also true you do see it. i haven't done this kind of analysis because as data aren't available to me for other countries. but all the normal indicators of how well those economies are performing say that they've been underperforming in much the same way the united states has been underperforming for the last decade, which it can lends credence to the notion that the this is about is globalization and information technology in the ship and the relative value of intangible assets is tangible assets. >> isn't the real point of difference in the health care you are making quick >> there is a big difference in health care. you're right. [inaudible] >> mind this kind of two-pronged two-pronged -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> well, on the question of women's earnings, yes, the fact that women are the primary caretakers of children in society as compared to their husbands and a lot of women with children don't have husbands, is certainly a factor. and i felt the biggest factor he
what is happening to the promise of the arabs spring and what does this mean for the united states? i certainly think it is important to ask these questions and to seek answers as you are doing today. let me on a personal note start with what happened in benghazi. no one wants to find out exactly what happened more than i do. i have appointed an accountability review board that has already started examining whether our security procedures were appropriate, whether they were properly implemented and what lessons we can and must learn for the future. we are working as thoroughly and expeditiously as possible, knowing that we cannot afford to sacrifice accuracy to speed and of course our government is sparing no effort tracking down the terrorists who perpetrated this attack. and we are focused as we must on what needs to be done to protect our people and our facilities. we had another terrible attack yesterday. i strongly condemn the killing of a long time yemeni employee at our embassy. we are working with yemeni authorities to investigate this and bring those responsible to justice as
in an interview the united states both economically and militarily and also in terms of its overall influence, really is as strong as it's ever been. he said this on february 21st, 2012 in case you want to pinpoint at least that statement. tom, do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it's ever been? >> that depends, david come if you were speaking about strong, relative in to houma? and in what area. i think there is no question in terms of influence. and on the global stage where the country that is most emulated in the world. but it is possible as mohammed said the world's cleanest dirty shirt also. and so come on a really prefer to think about american strength and i have to answer this question in a little bit of detail in terms of what are the things that have made us strong to start with? and i would argue that we had a formula for success in this country and was built on five pillars. one was educate our people love to and beyond what the technology was so we could get the most out of it. so it was universal primary education, the fac
and three other americans and marked the first assassination of a sitting united states ambassador in almost three decades. wendell has the news from the white house. republican complaints involved more than inadequate security at the consulate. >>reporter: they accusing the administration of misleading the public for a week by suggesting the attack grew from a protest against an anti-islam film made in this country. that film triggered protests in other arab countries including in cairo earlier on september 11th. in the debate last night, republican challenger paul ryan suggested the president blamed the film for the embassy attack. in a speech at the united nations, two weeks later, he blamed them. >> he went to the u.n. and said six times talked about the youtube video. look, if we hit by terrorists we will call it for what it is: a terrorist attack. our ambassador in paris has a marine detachment regarding him. shouldn't we have one regarding our ambassador in benghazi? >> there is a marine detachment at embassy in tripoli but not the consulate where ambassador stevens was killed. >>trac
at an advantage and disadvantage to those other countries including the united states, that it is taking advantage of and finding ways around some of the rules and procedures that exist under the world trade organization and we have to use that mechanism but it doesn't deal with all issues. it isn't clear whether it deals with the currency question. it may be difficult to use wto mechanisms to address some of the things the chinese government is doing through the so-called state owned enterprises to give them an advantage and make it more difficult for outsiders to compete for a share of the market. the point i would make overall is we have to find ways to exert leverage, and we have to pursue an integrated strategy that deals with this full range of issues. i guess since i am thinking of it i have a third point that agrees with jeff to the extent it can be a multilateral effort because i think we share important interests with other and dealing on these issues. >> the final and concluding question tonight will be from garrey wong left teach for china sent to us by e-mail and the question is addre
in order for us to invest in the united states and create jobs. >> we've got some good role models even though this roundtable -- business roundtable doesn't get involved and we don't even great legislators. my expense as a governor is a competitive state, our best teachers on political activist with the labor unions, and then later on george soros. he taught every wealthy individual american you can't afford to sit on the sidelines. and so i say go for it. >> we don't do endorsements either. we have a pack. we're very involved, and last week we launch a retail meets the vote campaign and will probably connect wit with a quar of a million retailers and millions of their employees. not endorsing, not to do that would give them voter guide, encouraging them to be in full. if we're going to address any of the issues, maybe we can get something done everything looks exactly the same. but there's a sense of people of a better understanding of our positions there's a greater likelihood we will get some action on them and that's why we've engaged our membership. >> let's go to questions from t
my life to continue that work is your united states senator. >> moderator: thank you. we hope this debate has subfolders as they ponder their decision and a selection only urge you to vote on election day. what you think our candidates, chris murphy and linda mcmahon and our reporter panel, al terzi, dennis house, keisha grant and mark davis if i could have your attention,e program on manufacturing society in the 21st century here at the institute. i welcome you on behalf of the institute both in the audience and those viewing remotely. i wanted to ask our president, walter isaacson, just to say a few words. it's always dangerous when your boss knows as much or more about the subject matter. >> that is definitely not true and that is why it is a pleasure to have tom here at the aspen institute because the one thing we do know about the issue of manufacturing is how important it is to america's economy and how ridiculous it is to try to think of a great economy that doesn't always have a healthy manufacturing sector. and so, when we were looking at the aspen institute and all t
president of the united states to help and support this next week in this great nation and to make sure we maintain america as the hope of the earth's protective so much. >> gentlemen, thank you so much. that brings an end to this year's debates in the want to thank lynn university and its students. i leave you with the words of my mom said, go vote. good night. >> thank you. >> thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [applause] >> as we continue to watch the scene on the campus of lynn university, our phone lines are open. your reaction to this third and final debate. the focus, for policy. first up, rose, a supporter of mitt romney from nevada. good evening. ." >> i wanted to say something about the moderator. been one-sided, i think. i believe in governor romney and i hope people open their eyes and take notice of what's going on in our country. >> thank you for the call. on our twitter page, when you were saying -- and david, dayton, ohio. supporter of the president. >> go ahead. host>> i am
women. >> you bet. >> don't write over mitt. >> don't write over the next president of the united states. my oldest son. he just graduated. >> give them hell today. >> thanks for coming. we have a lot to be excited about today. we are here on a corner -- [inaudible] i know there are a lot of small business representatives and employees here today. for your efforts and hard work, give them a hand. [applause] president calvin coolage once remarked that the business of america is business. his words are as true today as they were when he said them nearly 100 years ago. small business drives our economy, fuels or communities and feeds our families. [applause] small businesses like ours represent 97.8% of all employers. we employ half of america's work force and create between 60 respect -- 60% and 80% of job growth in the country. we know how very important those jobs numbers are. i imagine you feel like i do. i need my job, and so do our employees. thankfully here at ball we have secure jobs. you will see trucks coming and going from a long hard day any minute now. i can't imagine the stres
that are investing right here in iowa, right here in the united states of america, rebuilding our manufacturing. [applause] i want to control more of our own energy. you heard last night oil production is up, natural gas production is up. we'vee've also said is got to develop a new source of energy and we've got to be more fisht with our economy. so we raised fuel efficiency on cars so your car will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. we had double the amount of renewable energy we generate from wind and solar and buy fuels. today the united states of america is less dependent on foreign oil than any time in the last two decades. so the question -- so the choice you have -- you heard last night, it's not a choice between oil versus solar or natural gas versus wind. we all agree we got to increase oil production and natural gas production. but the question is whether we build on the progress for the new energy source of the future. i'm not going to keep on giving corporate tax funded welfare to oil companies $4 billion a year when we could use that money to promote wind and solar and long-lastin
for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on monday mitt romney set out his foreign policy plank. in eight days mitt romney and president obama will debate foreign affairs. we will ask the terrific panel what to make of romney's foreign policy. >>> next up, "argo," the amazing little known story of six americans who actually escaped from the embassy in tehran in 1979 and eventually got out of the country. i'll talk to the man at the cia who masterminded the operation. ben affleck plays him on the big screen, but you get the real version with us. >>> finally, drew foust, the president of harvard, on how the civil war changed america. >>> also, do you feel guilty take dagg off from work? don't. it's probably good for your country. i'll explain. >>> but first here's my take. recently intelligence squared a feisty forum in new york debated the proposition better elected islamists than dictators, referring to the choices confronting america in the middle east. the lead
to the president of the united states during the debate? it was deeply disrespectful. tonight, the over the line attacks on this president. >>> and stop the freakout. bill campaigns for the president as new poll numbers in key states bring good news. team obama and look who's stumping today. >>> plus, mitt romney is running away from views on women's issues that he held way, way back earlier this year. today he canceled his appearance on the view and sent his wife instead. just wait until you hear how she deen fended his record on women's rights to choose. they actually think this is going to work? okay. you're watching "politicsnation" on msnbc. ♪ i look at her, and i just want to give her everything. yeah, you -- you know, everything can cost upwards of...[ whistles ] i did not want to think about that. relax, relax, relax. look at me, look at me. three words, dad -- e-trade financial consultants. so i can just go talk to 'em? just walk right in and talk to 'em. dude, those guys are pros. they'll hook you up with a solid plan. they'll -- wa-- wa-- wait a minute. bobby? bobby! what are you do
the life of a united states ambassador, an american ambassador. this is serious stuff. americans deserve the truth on what happened. >> greta: so u.n. ambassador rice resign? earlier former secretary of defense donald rumsfeld went on the secretary. mr. secretary, nice to see you, sir. >> thank you. good to be with you. >> greta: there are many calls for ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, to resign. she has the backup of the secretary of state and the president, but there are calls for her to resign after going on all the talk shows and pushing this youtube video as the reason, the cause. your thoughts, sir? >> well, that's really up to the president and ambassador as far as i'm concerned. i think that the president can nominate who he wants, and the senate confirmed her. and she's the ambassador while she's there. i watched the presentation. and i thought it was amazing that someone in her position would go on with that degree of certainty, that fast, and that authoritiatively and be that wrong. >> greta: do you think she was perhaps hung out to dry? i thought it was unusual that the a
have ever served with in all my years in the united states senate and one of the people who, when you say his name in washington, when you say his name here i'm sure, when you say the name her call, you say integrity -- the name herb cole, you say integrity. [applause] your presence will be missed, particularly by me. we served together for a long time on the same committees. whenever i was not quite sure of what i was doing, i would pull him aside or go see him -- no, seriously, this man has a lot of wisdom. i will miss you, herb. [applause] my name is joe biden. i am deal by in -- i am jill biden's has been geared that is how i am known in washington -- husband. biden's that is how i am known in washington. last night, we had a little bit of a debate with a gentleman. and he is a gentleman. the demand from wisconsin, congressman ryan -- [booing] i hardly agree with anything he says, but i think he is a decent guy and he has a great family and he is a great husband and father. for that, i have great respect for him. [applause] but you know, anybody who watched the debate, i don't thi
that the main suspect in last year's iranian plot to assassinate the saudi ambassador to the united states pled guilty in a u.s. court yesterday. what does this maybe say about what the iranian government is willing to do? >> well, it did not need this particular case in order to prove once again that the iranians have been involved in terrorist activities against persons, against states, against countries for a long period of time. iran uses terrorism as a major tool of its international relations. it is as simple as all that. iran has plotted against others as well, individuals as well, and has also been shipping arms and equipment into areas inside the middle east. syria is one case now in point. there is an iranian force -- iranian forces are battling on syrian soil against syrians. there are iranians that have been in lebanon for quite some time and who have been handling equipment in lebanon, which has been of a great danger to israel. iran has used the state of sudan as an area through which they could send equipment through sudan to egypt to send that into the gaza strip. as i said, the
assistance today, we will be able to take a broad look at how the arab world is looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particul
is not fixed then it is time we change presidents and elect mitt romney the next president of the united states. tonight the forecast is that the president will win 287 electoral college votes. ari, the national polls are different on who has what lead by how much. but it is the battleground states. that lead is impressive. and there is a sizable lead in ohio and i'm aware of what you nailed in your rewrite the other night. >> tell me. >> what should these undecided voters have so much power? >> there is a funny thing happening. it is moving to a mobilization model. and what we are seeing now is, and we are seeing mobilization mez sages to the base. they are saying you have to get people excited. we are seeing a bullish attitude. and they don't need to focus as much on persuading. they are kicking into a gotv mode now. >> let's take a look at something put out today. new video with sara silverman which is about getting out the vote. >> in college mitt romney was so poor at harvard he had to sell stocks to get by. did you have to sell stocks to get by in college liz? >> no, i sold plasma in coll
one of which has the potential to decide who the next president of the united states will be. let's begin this hour's coverage in iowa where president obama kicked off a two-day coast-to-coast swing through eight states. he's calling it a campaign marathon extravaganza. likening it to an all-nighter. no surprise his itinerary consistents almost entirely of battleground states. cnn's chief white house correspondent jessica yellin is traveling with the president. >> reporter: wolf, president obama is hopping around the nation stumping for early votes and undecided voters. it's the kind of whirlwind tour you usually see in the last 48 hours before election day. the fact they're doing it 13 days before the ballots are cast is a sign just how important the early vote is to this campaign. now, from davenport, iowa, he heads to colorado, then he has stops in florida, virginia, again in ohio. he's going to las vegas, nevada, overnight. he also stops in las vegas -- in los angeles where he will be taping with jay leno and in chicago, illinois, where he'll be casting his own early ballot. h
tells well. the time i served in the united states senate i've been an independent voice for the people in the state and i've gotten results from the people of the state. in this campaign today, seven newspapers have made an editorial the as to who they would endorse. and all seven endorsed my candidacy. one of the reasons, not the only but one of the reasons that those newspapers endorsed me from the spread to california and a lot of places in between because of my record and the results that i achieved for the people in the state either leading the fight to cut the payroll tax for millions of americans and in pennsylvania so they could of dollars in the pocket to be doubled to invest in the economy, trade adjustment when the workers lose their jobs because of the unfair foreign competition and i let the fight pass that legislation given the training they need to get back on their feet. the so-called dredging plastic the deepening of the channels on was the key player in getting the most recent funding for that so getting results is key for the economy, and i have the honor to have ser
stoeld in the united states. he's a critic of the united states, more notably againstle elm peer yalists and some excuses from nationalizing the steel industry to the oil industry. and so a change here would mean a lot for the united states, in many different was. not just oil and energy companies but in our relations with south america in general. >> would election results come in a matter of hours or perhaps days after polls close? >> reporter: hopefully not days. they have a very organized election system here. the line-ups have been long, i can tell you that. by the same token they expect results in the wee hours. you know, perhaps six or seven hours from now we should know what's happening. there is some apprehension. this election could beery close. some people filtered out exit polls already, and they're vastly different. each side is saying they're going to win. listen to a young voter that i spoke to earlier today, and listen to what he told me when i asked him about voting. you don't want to say who you're voting for? >> yes, because the vote is secret. the important thing is t
's been very clear. the president of the united states owes the american people candor and transparency on what's happened. that clearly has been a test which has been failed. they started talking about the spontaneous eruption that was incredible on 9/11, and this is a video that's been around for months. second, we have the type of equipment used. third, we now know there were intelligence reports. fourth, wern the ambassador was concerned about the security, and fifth, we had a stonewalling for days and days with this very story. >> that's the key point with ambassador rice making the runs. larry, do you agree with rich williamson, larry, that, in fact, president obama owes the american people a clear, transparent explanation? >> i think he has given it. you have to remember everything rich said is contradicted by the director of national intelligence, general clapper, who was first appointed to the pentagon by the bush administration. he came out and he said, i gave them this information, and it was wrong. when we found out, i changed the narrative, and more important, obama's going
he is not ready to be the commander-in-chief of the united states military. >> nobody won. it was a draw. >> boring. so boring. it was the most boring debate i've ever seen. >> governor romney, while he may have "lost the debate" looked like a commander-in-chief. and presented himself in a presidential way. >> i think the president was very aggressive and it's hoard win a debate when you're not in that mode. >> i think it's unequivocal, romney won. not just tactically, but strategically. >> eric: so, let's each take a minute or so and call the debate the way we saw it. bob has promised he won't interrupt anyone. start with andrea and run around the table. what did you think? >> andrea: i think it was probably a draw. it's supposed to be boring. it's foreign policy debate not episode of "the a team." romney had one job, to convince the american people he cou job. obama's job was to convince romney he couldn't. i think that he failed at that. i think rom knew yesterday where the obama camp would go, to paint him as a warmonger. he knew where they would throw the ball. he loo
and the secretary of state then were briefed about the rising threat against the united states. >> brown: let me stay with you, mr. brzezinski. when we look at the ryan-romney... excuse me, the romney-ryan team talking about this foreign policy mess, the unraveling as paul ryan referred to it, particularly including libya and the larger middle east policy, what do you see? what do you make of that? >> well, i'm afraid there is truth in the fact that the position of the united states in the middle east is unraveling. but one has to go back a number of years and ask what has set that process in motion? i'm afraid that the united states simply has fumbled over the years. the unique opportunity it had to shape a more stable and more peaceful middle east. >> brown: what do you mean by that? >> well, first of all, the israeli-palestinian peace issue. you know, today the middle east... the masses are stirring. every public opinion poll tells us the masses have a negative view of american position on that issue because they see the united states as failing to move the peace process forward. i'm afraid t
for the united states senate? >> i'm run ling for the same reason i wanted to represent molakai when i was 27 years old. on the counsel making life better for seniors meant fix it is drinking fountain and installing ceiling fans. as mayor it meant capping taxes so people could afford to stay in their home even when property value skyrocketed. as governor it meant creating a robotics program so twins at a high school would major in engineering. as senator making life better means protecting social security and medicare for future generations. we have to cannot to invest in healthcare, education, national security and infrastructure while working to regain our financial strength as a nation. two years ago i was invited to be a founding member of a governor's counsel at the bipartisan policy center washington where i worked with former republican and democrat governors on issues important to the state and nation. unlike my opponent i have a track record of working in a bipartisan fashion to make life better for the people of hawaii. i ask for your vote so i can continue my work as hawaii's next
security threat to the united states and to israel. that's why i authorized the most crippling sanctions one country has ever eleven individual against another against iran. the results of that we just saw in news reports this week their currency devalued by 40%. the shipments of oil dramatically reduced hurting their economy. those sanctions i co-authorized is to create an economic news to deter them from seeking nuclear weapons. so i believe these sanctions still have time. it is been suggestioned the time clock is sometime next year. if these sanctions cripple their economy, i think we can deter them. >> well, that all sounds just fine but unfortunately, it doesn't appear that the sanctions are working. too little, too late and it's a very critical time for our country and for the world at large. and so i know that as a member of the senate, i'm going to do everything humanly possible through my vote, through advocacy and in every other way to make sure that iran never, never gets a nuclear weapon. this is the greatest threat to our country and to the world. and i just hope that the f
powder with the maritime powers, like brittany is to be our today, the united states. and then, there is an american and he put these two ideas together. and where the two great powers, the land power and d.c. power come together, he called the shout about. and the middle east is located in one of the world's great shutterbugs. the interesting thing is about them is that small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other, simply because it depends on which side they're on or which side they decide to shift two. in the middle east, the old part with syria and is today. but, after the fall of the soviet union, after the end of the cold war, there was another heart. since the entire east were taking place at that time, when the circulation state joined the middle east, when afghanistan pushed the edge of the middle east. and so today, we have a second part inside the middle east and that is iran. and those two cards, with their particular allies are causing this growing second global cold war. now the first indication we have is that is the reincarna
to the united states given a zero corporate tax rate environment. are you hearing these things from these other two guys? no, not even remotely close. they're arguing over who's going to spend more money on medicare. romney says he wants to balance the federal budget, but that he wants to increase spending for the military. well, it doesn't add up. and if we want to believe in the things that these guys are saying, then i guess we belief in the easter bunny and santa claus and by extension the tooth fairy and, steve, i don't think thai coming. >> host: gary johnson is with us, and want to remind viewers we'll a add a fourth line this morning for third-party voters, 202-585-3883 is your line, and we'll get to your calls in just a couple moments. at this point, um, governor johnson, what's the strategy for the rest of the election? where are you focusing most of your time and attention right now? >> guest: oh, right now there's a lot of attention that's being drawn to what it is that i am saying. i'm being recognized now for being at 6% nationally. um, i'll just ask you an obvious question here t
of the united states. the combined population of this country is roughly 21% of the total population of the united states, but that conglomeration of states is who gets to pick our next president. which means the equivalent of a country the size of france is deciding who the president is of a country the size of us. that little france-sized country gets tons and tons of attention now, to the point where even smallish population centers within this tiny bollous of states get lavish attention from the candidates. they even end up being the subjects of the candidates' flattering word play. >> as i was coming in, i got to meet the principal and the superintendent and i was saying, i stopped on the way down at a diner, had some breakfast, and someone said to me, ohioan said, where you coming from? and i said, dayton. they said, where you going? i said, marion. he said, i read in the paper, you said you love ohio. and that must be true, you've gone from dayton, ohio, to marrying ohio. i said, i never thought of it that way, i didn't think i was marrying y'all, but it's great to be here. it
be trusted to do what you say you're going to do. the president of the united states has done exactly what he said he would do as a candidate. he said he would end the war in iraq. he did. he said he would hand over authority in afghanistan. he's about to, is in the process of doing that. and he said he would go after al qaeda around the world and get osama bin laden, both of which he did. that was in stark contrast to governor romney. look, you're running to be president of the united states, you have to convince the american people you mean what you say, you say what you mean. what governor romney did last night is he reaffirmed all of those concerns that the people that know him best have about him, and that is he's willing to say anything it takes at the moment for political expediency sake. he will tell people what they want to hear. >> the trouble is with that argument is althou it does apply to romney in varying degrees, it also applies to barack obama. he's the guy who stood there last time round and said i will shut guantanamo bay and he didn't. what's the difference? >> the presiden
for the one eyed terror suspect extradicted here to the united states the we have new details from the hearing today. plus, some people are paying $5 and even up to $6 a gallon for gas! a fillup under those numbers could cost hundreds of bucks for some trucks. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>shepard: the one eyed terror suspect today pleaded not guilty for plotting to set up a terrorist training camp. in oregon. he and four others suspected terrorists arrived in the united states on saturday after they lost a legal battle to keep them in british custody. the terrorist suspect lost part of his arm in a fight against the soviets in afghanistan back if the day. they say he usually wears a hook but today he appeared in court with no hook, no nothing. a prison spokesman said they would not comment on individual inmates but in general, they remove prosthetics if they could pose a danger to anyone else. the chief fox correspondent is live outside the courthous
is inconceivable that the president of the united states was unaware of the facts that were obvious to the intelligence community. how could he have not known and if he didn't know, who kept that information from him? >> governor, that is the duty of inquiry. you ran a government. you understand and i think particularly where there is notice and now you should be getting real time reports from that -- that give accurate and actual information. this is the same paradigm we are seeing i fast and furious e the response is well, we didn't know anything about it. and you can't be able to be held unaccountable because you choose not to listen to those who have information to bring to you. and i'm being kind when i say choose not to listen. i think there is a duty of inquire arery. there is a duty of responsibility when something that significant that had to be one of the most important things the federal government was is responding to at that moment and for them to say that they aren't aware of the circumstances suggests one of two things. either incompetentence or are misrepresentation
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,966 (some duplicates have been removed)